uation CSR Campaigns Spring 2022 For more information, contact me, Kellie Cummings at: kcummings@jhu.edu or post your questions to the Syllabus/Assignment Discussion. AS.480.642.81 An Iterative Process Iterate: (v) to perform or utter repeatedly. 2 An Iterative Process “The Card Players” Sketch and final painting by Paul Cezanne 3 4 Measurement and Evaluation 5 Criteria and Tools 6 Lush Cosmetics Example OBJECTIVE CRITERIA TOOLS OBJECTIVE #1 YOUTH At least 30% more LGBT youth understand the negative affects of homelessness. YOUTH • Pre-, post-, and mid-campaign surveys with a representative sample of 1,000 LGBT youth contacted through True Colors social media accounts and utilizing Influencers to engage youth in the survey. • Measure traffic to / and engagement with the accounts that were created specifically for this campaign. • Track conversions from specialized campaign accounts (demonstrated by youth who sign up to learn more). PARENTS • Pre-, post-, and mid-campaign surveys with a representative sample of 1,000 parents contacted through Facebook parent groups. Partner with the True Colors Fund to raise awareness of LGBT youth homelessness and its negative impacts on individuals and families PARENTS by 30% nationwide over a two-year At least 30% of parents understand period. the risk of LGBT youth homelessness and its negative impacts.. 7 Social Media Measurement 8 Social Media Measurement 9 Your Homework Describe your measurement and evaluation approach for each objective. At minimum, show alignment across your objective, measurement criteria, and measurement tool. Note: The section following this slide presents additional measurement tools. These are not necessary for you to earn a good grade on this project. 10 Additional Measurement Resource #1 https://amecorg.com/amecframework/ 11 AMEC: Out-takes https://amecorg.com/amecframework/ 12 AMEC: Output https://amecorg.com/amecframework/ 13 AMEC: Outcomes https://amecorg.com/amecframework/ 14 AMEC: Impacts https://amecorg.com/amecframework/ 15 Additional Resource #2: Flash Cards 16 Additional Resource: Flash Cards 17 Additional Resource: Flash Cards 18 Your Homework Describe your measurement and evaluation approach for each objective. At minimum, show alignment across your objective, measurement criteria, and measurement tool. Alternatively, you may follow the AMEC Integrated Evaluation Framework. 19 Module 11 Monitoring and Evaluation CSR Campaigns Spring 2022 For more information, contact me, Kellie Cummings at: kcummings@jhu.edu or post your questions to the Syllabus/Assignment Discussion. AS.480.642.81 EVALUATION FLASH CARDS Embedding Evaluative Thinking in Organizational Culture Developed by Michael Quinn Patton Utilization-Focused Evaluation St. Paul, Minnesota Updated March 2017 CONTENTS 01. Evaluative Thinking INTRODUCING THE EVALUATION FLASH CARDS 02. Evaluation Questions 03. Logic Models 04. Theory of Change 05. Evaluation vs. Research 06. Dosage As part of our ongoing work to strengthen our support for communities, the trustees and staff of the Otto Bremer Trust engaged in a series of learning seminars on evaluation. In order to make the core concepts easily accessible and retrievable, we asked Michael Quinn Patton, who led the seminars, to create a set of basic reference cards. These became the Evaluation Flash Cards presented here, with the idea that a core concept can be revisited “in a flash.” Illustrations of the concepts are drawn from Otto Bremer Trust grants. We hope this resource is useful to other organizations committed to understanding and improving the results of the programs they support. 07. Disaggregation These cards are not intended to be definitive, universally applicable, or exhaustive of possibilities. 08. Changing Denominators, Changing Rates ABOUT THE AUTHOR 09. SMART Goals 10. Distinguishing Outcomes From Indicators 11. Performance Targets 12. Qualitative Evaluation 13. Triangulation Through Mixed Methods 14. Important and Rigorous Claims of Effectiveness 15. Accountability Evaluation 16. Formative Evaluation 17. Summative Evaluation 18. Developmental Evaluation 19. The IT Question 20. Fidelity or Adaptation 21. High-Quality Lessons Learned 22. Evaluation Quality Standards 23. Complete Evaluation Reporting 24. Utilization-Focused Evaluation 25. Distinguish Different Kinds of Evidence Michael Quinn Patton is an independent evaluation consultant with 40 years of experience conducting evaluations, training evaluators, and writing about ways to make evaluation useful. He is former president of the American Evaluation Association and recipient of both the Alva and Gunnar Myrdal Award for outstanding contributions to evaluation use and practice and the Paul F. Lazarsfeld Award for lifetime contributions to evaluation theory, both from the American Evaluation Association. The Society for Applied Sociology honored him with the Lester F. Ward Award for outstanding contributions to applied sociology. He is the author of six books on evaluation, including Essentials of Utilization-Focused Evaluation (2012). PERMISSION AND CITATION The Otto Bremer Trust permits use of these Evaluation Flash Cards for non‑commercial purposes, subject to full attribution (see the suggested citation reference below). For permission to use this material for commercial purposes, please contact the Trust at 651‑227‑8036 or communications@ottobremer.org. Citation reference: Patton, Michael Quinn (2014). Evaluation Flash Cards: Embedding Evaluative Thinking in Organizational Culture. St. Paul, MN: Otto Bremer Trust, ottobremer.org. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/deed.en_US 1 EVALUATIVE THINKING DISTINGUISH EVALUATIVE THINKING FROM EVALUATION. Evaluation is activity. Evaluative thinking is a way of doing business. Evaluative thinking is systematic results-oriented thinking about: —— What results are expected, —— How results can be achieved, —— What evidence is needed to inform future actions and judgments, and —— How results can be improved in the future. Evaluative thinking becomes most meaningful when it is embedded in an organization’s culture. This means that people in the organization expect to engage with each other in clarifying key concepts, differentiating means and ends, thinking in terms of outcomes, examining the quality of evidence available about effectiveness, and supporting their opinions and judgments with evidence. Evaluative thinking is what characterizes learning organizations. Keeping up with research and evaluation findings becomes part of everyone’s job. Inquiring into the empirical basis for assertions about what works and doesn’t work becomes standard operating procedure as people in the organization engage with each other and interact with partners and others outside the organization. Critical thinking and reflection are valued and reinforced. Infusing evaluative thinking into organizational culture involves looking at how decision makers and staff incorporate evaluative inquiry into everything they do as part of ongoing attention to mission fulfillment and continuous improvement. Integrating evaluation into organizational culture means “mainstreaming evaluation”—that is, making it central to the work rather than merely an add-on, end-of-project paperwork mandate. INDICATORS THAT EVALUATIVE THINKING IS EMBEDDED IN AN ORGANIZATION’S CULTURE —— Evaluative thinking permeates the work, with conscious and constant reflection on project, program, regional, and organizational experience and the intention to implement improvements based on what is learned. —— Evaluative thinking is demonstrated in the implementation of well-focused programs and in the use of highquality evaluations that feed into program and organizational decision making. —— Time and resources are allocate

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