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I need an anannotated bibliography explaining what is being talked about in the PowerPoint, also I need a conclusion statement, and this is all from your personal research and opinion on cross-sex friendships. You can relate this or tie it back to gender communication in any way possible.There Needs to be a link or file to the slides on the cross-sex friendships, and then a separate link to the presentation. So there is a PowerPoint for the cross sex friendships and then there is a PowerPoint for presentation, but it cannot be exactly the same. The rubric to know what is expected is bSIXTH EDITION Expert Public Speaking Advice, Now With Exceptional Digital Resources With expert advice unavailable elsewhere, and an easy-to-navigate format, A Speaker’s Guidebook is the essential resource for becoming a more effective speaker in the classroom, at work, and in the community. When accompanied by LaunchPad, this edition’s print and digital tools converge to address all facets of speech-making in captivating ways—from understanding core fundamentals to using technology for research and giving speeches online. LaunchPad’s new collection of speech videos (accompanied by questions) provides memorable examples of both effective and “needs improvement” techniques, while its adaptive quizzing program, LearningCurve, creates a personalized learning experience that adjusts to each individual’s strengths and study needs. Where Students Learn Get the most out of your book with LaunchPad, where video, audio, and activities with immediate feedback are available. Go to the inside back cover to learn how you can get access and look for these icons throughout the book. LearningCurve — game-like quizzing that adapts to what you already know and helps you master the concepts you need to learn. Video — more than 300 video clips and full-length videos that illustrate speech techniques, including five new full-length speeches and related speech clips. e-readings — additional resources and reference materials like visual guides and documentation help. “This is the quintessential public speaking text.”   — Donna Elkins, Jefferson Community and Technical College “Contemporary handbook; great for online or hybrid courses. Includes numerous checklists and tips boxes, which are a big hit with students. Works well as a reference book as students prepare their speeches, or refer back to in years to come . . . includes timely information on online presentations and the changing face of presentational speaking.” — Brandi Queensberry, Virginia Tech “Its design makes it easy to access, reference, and read about the world of public speaking. “ — Jennifer Hallet, Young Harris College macmillanhighered.com Dan O’Hair | Rob Stewart | Hannah Rubenstein mech_ OHair-ASG6-SE-071714 GETTING STARTED WITH CONFIDENCE ORGANIZING AND OUTLINING pages 1–34 INTRODUCTIONS, CONCLUSIONS, AND LANGUAGE PUBLIC SPEAKING BASICS AUDIENCE ANALYSIS AND TOPIC SELECTION VOCAL AND NONVERBAL DELIVERY 6 Analyzing the Audience 7 Selecting a Topic and Purpose PRESENTATION AIDS 20 Using Presentation Aids in the Speech 21 Designing Presentation Aids 22 Using Presentation Software pages 269–308 pages 119–164 00_OHa_63536_IFC.indd 2 17 Methods of Delivery 18 The Voice in Delivery 19 The Body in Delivery pages 243–268 pages 77–118 SUPPORTING THE SPEECH 8 Developing Supporting Material 9 Finding Credible Print and Online Materials 10 Citing Sources in Your Speech 14 Developing the Introduction 15 Developing the Conclusion 16 Using Language to Style the Speech pages 213–242 pages 35–76 3 Managing Speech Anxiety 4 Listeners and Speakers 5 Ethical Public Speaking 11 Organizing the Body of the Speech 12 Types of Organizational Arrangements 13 Outlining the Speech pages 165–212 1 Becoming a Public Speaker 2 Giving It a Try: Preparing Your First Speech 21/10/14 2:11 PM FORMS OF SPEECHES Quick Access Menu pages 309–406 Using A Speaker’s Guidebook pages 407–460 23 The Informative Speech 24 The Persuasive Speech 25 Developing Arguments for the Persuasive Speech 26 Organizing the Persuasive Speech 27 Special Occasion Speeches • The index • A list of feature boxes and checklists • A list of sample speeches • A list of visual guides SPEAKING BEYOND THE SPEECH CLASSROOM 28 Preparing Online Presentations 29 Collaborating and Presenting in Groups 30 Business and Professional Presentations 31 Speaking in Other College Courses The menu to the left briefly displays the book’s content. Each menu box corresponds to a tabbed divider in the text. The dividers contain more detailed lists of contents in each section and are followed by “Speaker’s Reference” pages that offer executive-like summaries of the subsequent chapters. At the back of the book, you will find: Where Students Learn SAMPLE SPEECHES pages 461–482 Sample Visually Annotated Informative Speech Sample Visually Annotated Persuasive Speech Sample Special Occasion Speech Go to the interior back cover to learn how you can get access to LaunchPad and look for these icons throughout the book. pages 483–512 01_OHa_63536_FM_a_lvi.indd a Video—more than 300 video clips and full-length speech videos, including five new full-length speeches and related speech clips. E-readings—additional resources and reference materials, such as visual guides and documentation help. REFERENCE AND RESEARCH APPENDICES A Commonly Mispronounced Words B–C Documentation Styles: Chicago and APA D Glossary Digital Appendices E Question-and-Answer Sessions F Preparing for TV and Radio Communication G–I Documentation Styles: MLA, CBE/CSE, IEEE LearningCurve, an adaptive quizzing program. To Find Out More For more on using the book’s reference aids and digital tools, turn to “How to Use This Book” (p. v). 21/10/14 5:00 PM this page left intentionally blank 01_OHa_63536_FM_a_lvi.indd b 21/10/14 5:00 PM A SPEAKER’S GUIDEBOOK Text and Reference 01_OHa_63536_FM_a_lvi.indd i 21/10/14 5:00 PM this page left intentionally blank 01_OHa_63536_FM_a_lvi.indd ii 21/10/14 5:00 PM SIX TH E D I T I O N A SPEAKER’S GUIDEBOOK Text and Reference Dan O’Hair University of Kentucky Rob Stewart Texas Tech University Hannah Rubenstein Bedford/St. Martin’s Boston 01_OHa_63536_FM_a_lvi.indd iii ● New York 21/10/14 5:00 PM For Bedford/St. Martin’s Vice President, Editorial, Macmillan Higher Education Humanities: Edwin Hill Publisher for Communication: Erika Gutierrez Senior Developmental Editor: Lorraina Morrison Senior Production Editor: Pamela Lawson Senior Production Supervisor: Steven Cestaro Marketing Manager: Thomas Digiano Editorial Assistant: Joanna Kamouh Copy Editor: Eric Raetz Indexer: Mary White Text Permissions: Linda Winters Photo Permissions: Nick Ciani Text Design: Jerilyn Bockorick Cover Design: Marine Miller Composition: Cenveo Publisher Services Printing and Binding: Quad/Graphics Copyright © 2015, 2012, 2010, 2007 by Bedford/St. Martin’s All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, except as may be expressly permitted by the applicable copyright statutes or in writing by the Publisher. Manufactured in the United States of America. 9 8 7 6 5 4 f e d c b a For information, write: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 75 Arlington Street, Boston, MA 02116 (617-399-4000) ISBN: 978-1-457-66353-6 (Student Edition) ISBN: 978-1-457-68980-2 (Student Edition with The Essential Guide to Rhetoric) Acknowledgments Text acknowledgments and copyrights appear at the back of the book on page 529, which constitute an extension of the copyright page. Art acknowledgments and copyrights appear on the same page as the art selections they cover. It is a violation of the law to reproduce these selections by any means whatsoever without the written permission of the copyright holder. At the time of publication all Internet URLs published in this text were found to accurately link to their intended website. If you do find a broken link, please forward the information to will.stonefield@macmillan.com, so that it can be corrected for the next printing. 01_OHa_63536_FM_a_lvi.indd iv 21/10/14 5:00 PM How to Use This Book and Digital Resources A Speaker’s Guidebook: Text and Reference has been carefully designed to help you easily and quickly access the information you need to prepare speeches and presentations. The text may be used in a public speaking course, in other college courses, in your working life after college, and in your civic activities in your community. Digital tools such as adaptive quizzing and sample speech videos are integrated throughout the book and through the LaunchPad platform. See the inside back cover to learn more about access. The Main Menu and Table of Contents The twelve tab dividers (discussed in more detail on the next page) allow the book to flip open easily, and the book’s binding lets it lie flat. On the inside front cover you will find the Main Menu that offers a listing of the thirty-one chapters in the text, color-coded to the corresponding tab, and a visual link to help you find each one. For even more information or to find a specific topic, simply turn to the full table of contents on p. xxix. GETTING STARTED WITH CONFIDENCE ORGANIZING AND OUTLINING Quick Access Menu Using A Speaker’s Guidebook pages 407–460 • The index • A list of feature boxes and checklists • A list of sample speeches • A list of visual guides SPEAKING BEYOND THE SPEECH CLASSROOM pages 213–242 pages 35–76 pages 309–406 pages 1–34 14 Developing the Introduction 15 Developing the Conclusion 16 Using Language to Style the Speech 23 The Informative Speech 24 The Persuasive Speech 25 Developing Arguments for the Persuasive Speech 26 Organizing the Persuasive Speech 27 Special Occasion Speeches 28 Preparing Online Presentations 29 Collaborating and Presenting in Groups 30 Business and Professional Presentations 31 Speaking in Other College Courses The menu to the left briefly displays the book’s content. Each menu box corresponds to a tabbed divider in the text. The dividers contain more detailed lists of contents in each section and are followed by “Speaker’s Reference” pages that offer executive-like summaries of the subsequent chapters. At the back of the book, you will find: Where Students Learn AUDIENCE ANALYSIS AND TOPIC SELECTION SAMPLE SPEECHES VOCAL AND NONVERBAL DELIVERY 6 Analyzing the Audience 7 Selecting a Topic and Purpose pages 483–512 pages 269–308 pages 119–164 A Commonly Mispronounced Words B–C Documentation Styles: Chicago and APA D Glossary Digital Appendices E Question-and-Answer Sessions F Preparing for TV and Radio Communication G–I Documentation Styles: MLA, CBE/CSE, IEEE Go to the interior back cover to learn how you can get access to LaunchPad and look for these icons throughout the book. LearningCurve, an adaptive quizzing program. Video—more than 300 video clips and full-length speech videos, including five new full-length speeches and related speech clips. E-readings—additional resources and reference materials, such as visual guides and documentation help. REFERENCE AND RESEARCH APPENDICES PRESENTATION AIDS 20 Using Presentation Aids in the Speech 21 Designing Presentation Aids 22 Using Presentation Software Sample Visually Annotated Informative Speech Sample Visually Annotated Persuasive Speech Sample Special Occasion Speech pages 461–482 17 Methods of Delivery 18 The Voice in Delivery 19 The Body in Delivery pages 243–268 pages 77–118 SUPPORTING THE SPEECH 8 Developing Supporting Material 9 Finding Credible Print and Online Materials 10 Citing Sources in Your Speech FORMS OF SPEECHES INTRODUCTIONS, CONCLUSIONS, AND LANGUAGE PUBLIC SPEAKING BASICS 3 Managing Speech Anxiety 4 Listeners and Speakers 5 Ethical Public Speaking 11 Organizing the Body of the Speech 12 Types of Organizational Arrangements 13 Outlining the Speech pages 165–212 1 Becoming a Public Speaker 2 Giving It a Try: Preparing Your First Speech To Find Out More For more on using the book’s reference aids and digital tools, turn to “How to Use This Book” (p. v). v 01_OHa_63536_FM_a_lvi.indd v 21/10/14 5:00 PM vi How to Use This Book and Digital Resources The Tabs A Speaker’s Guidebook is divided into twelve tabbed sections that are arranged into four color banks—blue, orange, purple, and green. Each section opens with a tab divider; the front of the tab divider identifies the tab name and the chapters contained in that section. The back indicates chapter titles and detailed information about major topics covered. To find the specific information you want, look for the appropriate tab and open the book to it. FORMS OF SPEECHES (309–406) FORMS OF SPEECHES The back of each tab divider offers a table of contents for the chapters within that tabbed section. The Speaker’s Reference pages for the chapters within the section follow each tab divider. SPEAKER’S REFERENCE CHAPTER 23 The Informative Speech 322 Focus on Sharing Knowledge 322 c CHECKLIST Help Listeners Follow Along 324 Categories of Informative Speeches 325 Decide How to Convey the Information 326 Take Steps to Reduce Confusion 329 c CHECKLIST Strategies for Explaining Complex Information 330 Arrange Speech Points in a Pattern 331 c CHECKLIST Guidelines for Clearly Communicating Your Informative Message 333 c SAMPLE VISUALLY ANNOTATED INFORMATIVE SPEECH Freeganism: More Than a Free Lunch, DJ McCabe 333 Social Media, Social Identity, and Social Causes, Anna Davis 338 c SAMPLE VISUALLY ANNOTATED INFORMATIVE SPEECH CHAPTER 24 The Persuasive Speech 344 What Is a Persuasive Speech? 344 c CHECKLIST Conditions for Choosing a Persuasive Purpose 345 c ETHICALLY SPEAKING Persuasive Speeches Respect Audience Choices 345 Classical Persuasive Appeals: Ethos, Pathos, and Logos 346 c ETHICALLY SPEAKING Using Emotions Ethically 350 c CHECKLIST Displaying Ethos in the Persuasive Speech 352 Contemporary Persuasive Appeals: Needs and Motivations 352 c SELF-ASSESSMENT CHECKLIST Tips for Increasing Speaker Credibility 357 CHAPTER 25 Developing Arguments for the Persuasive Speech 358 What Is an Argument? 358 c ETHICALLY SPEAKING Engaging in Arguments in the Public Arena 360 Types of Claims Used in Persuasive Speeches 361 c A CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE Addressing Culture in the Persuasive Speech 362 Types of Evidence 363 Types of Warrants 364 c CHECKLIST Testing the Strength of Your Evidence 364 01_OHa_63536_FM_a_lvi.indd vi 21/10/14 5:01 PM How to Use This Book and Digital Resources vii Speaker’s Reference Sections You may well find one of the most useful features of A Speaker’s Guidebook to be its Speaker’s Reference pages that immediately follow each tab divider. These pages provide executive summaries of the material covered within the subsequent chapters. A list of key terms in the chapters appears at the end of the Speaker’s Reference pages, just before the opening of the first chapter within that tabbed section. SPEAKER’S REFERENCE LearningCurve can help you review. Go to bedfordstmartins.com/speakersguide SPEAKER’S REFERENCE Speaker’s Reference pages offer a quick review of the most important information in subsequent chapters through summaries and key terms. FORMS OF SPEECHES CHAPTER 23 The Informative Speech Focus on Sharing Knowledge and Demonstrating Relevance • Strive to enlighten (informative intent) rather than to advocate (persuasive intent). (p. 322) • Use audience analysis to determine information needs. (p. 321) • Show the audience why the topic is relevant to them. (p. 323) • Present new and interesting information. (p. 323) • Look for ways to increase understanding. (p. 324) Identify the Subject Matter of Your Informative Speech To refer to the full in-text coverage of a topic, simply flip to the page indicated in parentheses. • Is it a speech about objects or phenomena—e.g., anything that isn’t human? (p. 325) • Is it a speech about people—e.g., individuals or groups who have made a difference? (p. 325) • Is it a speech about an event—e.g., a noteworthy occurrence? (p. 325) • Is it a speech about a process—e.g., an explanation of how something works, as in a series of steps leading to a product or end result? (p. 326) • Is it a speech about an issue—e.g., a social problem or matter in dispute? (p. 326) • Is it a speech about a concept—e.g., an idea, theory, or belief? (p. 326) Decide How to Convey the Information • Use definition to clarify. (p. 327) • Provide descriptions to paint a picture. (p. 328)b

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