COMM1010: Communication at Work Unit 4 Touchstone Template: Plan and Communicate a Time-Based Task Student Name: Date: PART 1: CUSTOMER EMAIL STEP 1: Review the scenario and email message from your manager. STEP 2: Write an email message to the customer (no more than two body paragraphs) that informs them about the new delivery date and the refund to compensate for the inconvenience. Your message should be limited to no more than 12 sentences or 200 words. Use the following email template. CUSTOMER EMAIL TEMPLATE Subject Line Enter the subject line of your email. It should convey the central point of your message. Greeting: Enter the greeting for your email First paragraph: Tell your reader why you’re writing this email, using professional wording. Provide background information. Second paragraph: Provide the main information for your email. What is it you want to explain or accomplish? Ending paragraph: Provide a conclusion for your email. Closing: Create your closing. Signature: Type your name for your signature. STEP 3: Review your message to ensure that: ● ● ● It includes information relevant for the customer, including the purpose of the email and how the errors will be addressed. It emphasizes important points using style mechanics common in professional writing. It uses professional language and tone appropriate for a response to an important customer. PART 2: COMMUNICATE A TIME-BASED TASK STEP 1: Review the scenario and email message from your manager. Also review the to-do items that need to be completed and their deadlines in the chart below. Goal Task Due Date Status Inform customer Email Renee Colon Monday To do Inform relevant departments Contact Accounts Receivable (AR) Monday (end of day) To do Contact Shipping Monday (end of day) To do AR issues refund to customer Tuesday To do AR does not charge for replacement Tuesday To do AR send confirmation to customer Tuesday To do Package is expedited Wednesday To do Tracking info sent to customer Wednesday To do Refund customer Ship replacement package STEP 2: Based on this information, you will need to communicate an internal plan regarding the refund and redelivery of the shipment by drafting a message to your colleagues in the Accounts Receivable and Shipping Departments. Your message should clearly identify who has what task and the time frame for completion. Select an appropriate tool from the following list to communicate this message to your colleagues. Explain why this would be an effective tool for this purpose. Tool Options (Select one): ● Chat message (e.g., Slack, Microsoft Teams) ● ● ● ● Email (e.g., Microsoft Outlook) Video Message (e.g., Webex, Zoom) Text message (e.g., Android of iOS text messaging) Voicemail (e.g., Conference phone, cell phones / smartphones, Google Voice) Tool Selected Why is this an effective tool for the purpose of the message? STEP 3: Use the following template to construct your message. Format it appropriately for the tool you have selected. If you selected a video message or voicemail tool, provide a written transcript of your message below. Your message should be limited to no more than 12 sentences or 200 words. TEAM MESSAGE TEMPLATE STEP 4: Review your message and make edits to ensure that: ● ● It clearly identifies who has what to-do item and by what time it needs to be completed. It emphasizes important points. ● It uses professional language and tone appropriate for internal communication with coworkers. SCENARIO: On Monday morning, you arrive at work and discover you have an email from your manager, Sara, about a customer service issue. She is worried because one of the company’s most important clients did not receive their shipment. While she acknowledges it isn’t your fault, she needs you to work quickly to resolve the issue. Her email outlines some tasks that must be completed in order to address the problem and fast track the solution: So last Friday, our client didn’t receive their shipment, and now it’s Monday, making it three days late. We need this problem fixed soon. I need you to email Renee Colon, the client’s executive assistant, right away. Apologize for the delay and let her know we’re fixing this issue, but don’t overdo it. Make sure they know we appreciate their business. Then, contact Accounts Receivable. Have them issue a full refund on the customer’s delivery costs and send confirmation of the refund to them as well. Make sure the client is not charged for the new delivery either. And have Shipping expedite the new shipment and send tracking info to the customer. If you contact both departments by the end of today, Accounts Receivable should be done by Tuesday at the latest, and Shipping should have the package out the door with tracking by Wednesday. The table below lists the relevant tasks and deadlines that need to be done to accomplish the stated goals. Goal Task Due Date Status Inform customer Email Renee Colon Monday To do Inform relevant departments Contact Accounts Receivable (AR) Monday (end of day) To do Contact Shipping Monday (end of day) To do AR issues refund to customer Tuesday To do AR does not charge for replacement Tuesday To do AR sends confirmation to customer Tuesday To do Package is expedited Wednesday To do Tracking info sent to customer Wednesday To do Refund customer Ship replacement package ASSIGNMENT: This assignment has two parts. The first part is to prepare a clear and concise email communication (no more than two paragraphs in the body of the email) to the customer that will inform them about the new delivery date and the refund to compensate for the inconvenience. The second part is to communicate an internal plan regarding the refunding and redelivery of the shipment. You will draft a message to your colleagues in the Accounts Receivable and Shipping departments about the time frame of each task that clearly identifies who has which task and by what time it needs to be completed. You will need to select an appropriate tool to communicate this message to your colleagues and explain why this would be an effective tool for this purpose. For this assignment, you will: • Demonstrate your ability to craft messages for the appropriate purpose, tone, structure, and audience. • Be sure to include all the important information you need to communicate. • Select an appropriate tool for workplace communication. • Edit your messages for organization and style, ensuring professionalism with respect to formatting, spelling, punctuation, and grammar. Download the template below, which further breaks down the steps involved in this assignment. You will return the completed template as your Touchstone submission.. In the end, Hall and Whannel’s position seems to drift very close to the teaching strategy they condemn as ‘opportunist’, in that they seem to suggest that because most school students do not have access, for a variety of reasons, to the best that has been thought and said, they can instead be given critical access to the best that has been thought and said within the popular arts of the new mass media: jazz and good films will make up for the absence of Beethoven and Shakespeare. As they explain, This process – the practical exclusion of groups and classes in society from the selective tradition of the best that has been and is being produced in the culture – is especially damaging in a democratic society, and applies to both the traditional and new forms of high art. However, the very existence of this problem makes it even more important that some of the media which are capable of communicating work of a serious and significant kind should remain open and available, and that the quality of popular work transmitted there should be of the highest order possible, on its own terms (75). Where they do break significantly with Leavisism is in advocating training in critical awareness, not as a means of defence against popular culture, but as a means to discriminate between what is good and what is bad within popular culture. It is a move that was to lead to a decisive break with Leavisism when the ideas of Hall and Whannel, and those of Hoggart, Williams and Thompson, were brought together under the banner of culturalism at the Birmingham University Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies. Storey, J. (2018). Cultural theory and popular culture : An introduction. Taylor & Francis Group. Created from csusm on 2022-03-15 23:12:35. 57 58 Chapter 3 Culturalism The Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies In the introduction to The Long Revolution, Williams (1965) regrets the fact that ‘there is no academic subject within which the questions I am interested in can be followed through; I hope one day there might be’ (10). Three years after the publication of these comments, Hoggart established the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies at the University of Birmingham. In the inaugural lecture, ‘Schools of English and contemporary society’, establishing the Centre, Hoggart (1970) states: ‘It is hard to listen to a programme of pop songs  .  .  .  without feeling a complex mixture of attraction and repulsion’ (258). Once the work of the Centre began its transition, as Michael Green3 (1996) describes it, ‘from Hoggart to Gramsci’ (49), especially under the directorship of Hall, we find emerging a very different attitude towards pop music culture, and popular culture in general. Many of the researchers who followed Hoggart into the Centre (including myself ) did not find pop music in the least repulsive; on the contrary, we found it profoundly attractive. We focused on a different Hoggart, one critical of taking what is said at face value, a critic who proposed a procedure that would eventually resonate through the reading practices of cultural studies: Copyright © 2018. Taylor & Francis Group. All rights reserved. we have to try and see beyond the habits to what the habits stand for, to see through the statements to what the statements really mean (which may be the opposite of the statements themselves), to detect the differing pressures of emotion behind idiomatic phrases and ritualistic observances.  .  .  .  [And to see the way] mass publications [for example] connect with commonly accepted attitudes, how they are altering those attitudes, and how they are meeting resistance (1990: 17–19). Culturalists study cultural texts and practices in order to reconstitute or reconstruct the experiences, values, etc. – the ‘structure of feeling’ of particular groups or classes or whole societies, in order to better understand the lives of those who lived the culture. In different ways Hoggart’s example, Williams’s social definition of culture, Thompson’s act of historical rescue, Hall and Whannel’s ‘democratic’ extension of Leavisism – each contribution discussed here argues that popular culture (defined as the lived culture of ordinary men and women) is worth studying. It is on the basis of these and other assumptions of culturalism, channelled through the traditions of English, sociology and history, that British cultural studies began. However, research at the Centre quickly brought culturalism into complex and often contradictory and conflictual relations with imports of French structuralism (see Chapter 6), in turn bringing the two approaches into critical dialogue with developments in ‘Western Marxism’, especially the work of Louis Althusser and Antonio Gramsci (see Chapter 4). It is from this complex and critical mixture that the ‘post-disciplinary’ field of British cultural studies was born. Storey, J. (2018). Cultural theory and popular culture : An introduction. Taylor & Francis Group. Created from csusm on 2022-03-15 23:12:35. Further reading Notes 1. For another excellent example of ‘history from below’, see Chauncey (1994). As Chauncey explains, ‘As my focus on street-level policing of gender suggests, another of the underlying arguments of this book is that histories of homosexuality – and sex and sexuality more generally – have suffered from their overreliance on the discourse of the elite. The most powerful elements of American society devised the official maps of the culture.  .  .  .  While this book pays those maps their due, it is more interested in reconstructing the maps etched in the city streets by daily habit, the paths that guided men’s practices even if they were never published or otherwise formalized.  .  .  .  This book seeks to analyze  .  .  .  the changing representation of homo­ sexuality in popular culture and the street-level social practices and dynamics that shaped the ways homosexually active men were labeled, understood themselves, and interacted with others’ (26–7). 2. I remember at school a teacher who encouraged us to bring to music lessons our records by the Beatles, Dylan and the Stones. The class would always end the same way (as would his liberalism) – he would try to convince us of the fundamental error of our adolescent musical taste. 3. Michael died in December 2010. He was my supervisor at the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies, University of Birmingham. His contribution to my academic development (at the CCCS and after) was enormous; I could never thank him enough. Copyright © 2018. Taylor & Francis Group. All rights reserved. Further reading Storey, John (ed.), Cultural Theory and Popular Culture: A Reader, 4th edn, Harlow: Pearson Education, 2009. This is the companion volume to the previous edition of this book. A fully updated 5th edition containing further readings is due for publication in 2018. An interactive website is also available (www.routledge.com/cw/storey), which contains helpful student resources and a glossary of terms for each chapter. Chambers, Iain, Popular Culture: The Metropolitan Experience, London: Routledge, 1986. An interesting and informed survey – mostly from the perspective of culturalism – of the rise of urban popular culture since the 1880s. Clarke, John, Chas Critcher and Richard Johnson (eds), Working Class Culture: Studies in History and Theory, London: Hutchinson, 1979. Some good essays from a culturalist perspective. See especially Richard Johnson’s ‘Three problematics: elements of a theory of working class culture’. Eagleton, Terry (ed.), Raymond Williams: Critical Perspectives, Cambridge: Polity Press, 1989. Essays in critical appreciation of the work of Raymond Williams. Storey, J. (2018). Cultural theory and popular culture : An introduction. Taylor & Francis Group. Created from csusm on 2022-03-15 23:12:35. 59 60 Chapter 3 Culturalism Copyright © 2018. Taylor & Francis Group. All rights reserved. Hall, Stuart and Tony Jefferson (eds), Resistance Through Rituals, London: Hutchinson, 1976. The Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies’ seminal account of youth subcultures. Chapter 1 provides a classic statement of the CCCS’s version of culturalism. Hall, Stuart, Dorothy Hobson, Andrew Lowe and Paul Willis (eds), Culture, Media, Language, London: Hutchinson, 1980. A selection of essays covering almost the first ten years of the CCCS’s published work. See especially Chapter 1, Stuart Hall’s important account of the theoretical development of work at the CCCS: ‘Cultural studies and the Centre: some problematics and problems’. Jones, Paul, Raymond Williams’s Sociology of Culture: A Critical Reconstruction, Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2004. An interesting account, but its relentless insistence on claiming Williams for sociology distorts his place in cultural studies. Kaye, Harvey J. and Keith McClelland (eds), E.P. Thompson: Critical Perspectives, Oxford: Polity Press, 1990. A collection of critical essays on different aspects of Thompson’s contribution to the study of history; some useful references to The Making of the English Working Class. O’Connor, Alan (ed.), Raymond Williams: Writing, Culture, Politics, Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1989. Provides a critical survey of Williams’s work. Excellent bibliography. Storey, J. (2018). Cultural theory and popular culture : An introduction. Taylor & Francis Group. Created from csusm on 2022-03-15 23:12:35. 4 Marxisms Copyright © 2018. Taylor & Francis Group. All rights reserved. Classical Marxism Marxism is a difficult and contentious body of work. But it is also more than this: it is a body of revolutionary theory with the purpose of changing the world. As Marx (1976b) famously said: ‘The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways; the point is to change it’ (65). This makes Marxist analysis political in a quite specific way. But this is not to suggest that other methods and approaches are apolitical; on the contrary, Marxism insists that all are ultimately political. As the American Marxist cultural critic Fredric Jameson (1981) puts it, ‘the political perspective [is] the absolute horizon of all reading and all interpretation’ (17). The Marxist approach to culture insists that texts and practices must be analysed in relation to their historical conditions of production (and in some versions, the changing conditions of their consumption and reception). What makes the Marxist methodology different from other ‘historical’ approaches to culture is the Marxist conception of history. The fullest statement of the Marxist approach to history is contained in the Preface and Introduction to A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy. Here Marx outlines the now famous ‘base/superstructure’ account of social and historical development. In Chapter 1, I discussed this formulation briefly in relation to different concepts of ideology. I shall now explain the formulation in more detail and demonstrate how it might be used to understand the ‘determinations’ that influence the production and consumption of popular culture. Marx argues that each significant period in history is constructed around a particular ‘mode of production’: that is, the way in which a society is organized (i.e. slave, feudal, capitalist) to produce the material necessaries of life – food, shelter, etc. In general terms, each mode of production produces: (i) specific ways of obtaining the necessaries of life; (ii) specific social relationships between workers and those who control the mode of production, and (iii) specific social institutions (including cultural ones). At the heart of this analysis is the claim that how a society produces its means of existence (its particular ‘mode of production’) ultimately determines the political, social and cultural shape of that society and its possible future development. As Marx explains, ‘The mode of production of material life conditions the social, political and intellectual life process in general’ (1976a: 3). This claim is based on certain assumptions about Storey, J. (2018). Cultural theory and popular culture : An introduction. Taylor & Francis Group. Created from csusm on 2022-03-15 23:13:38. 62 Chapter 4 Marxisms Copyright © 2018. Taylor & Francis Group. All rights reserved. the relationship between ‘base’ and ‘superstructure’. It i

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