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Hello again, I would like to let u know that the professor made some comments about the paper. I would like to u to fix it. Professor feedback: “So two things, in class I thought the 20s was a reference to the prewar era, but it sounds like you’re focusing on wartime, which was the 1940s. Also, your sources are all secondary (beyond the book of course). You need two sources that were either originally published in the ’40s, or written by someone who went through the events firsthand.”1 attachmentsSlide 1 of 1

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1 History Outline João Dulebea Cameron University History Caroline Sibley November 11 2021 2 History Outline The novel Farewell to Manzanar is a good piece of writing that exposes the issues related to racism that heightened during the Second World War between Japan and America. The part discussed in class begins with her being welcomed into the classroom, where she is the only one who is half Japanese and American. The narrative explores some of the hardships she undergoes at school. She understands why there are some social disparities against her parents, who are Japanese, in the society they lived in. It mentions many issues related to racism and created by the war, which in the end forms the future personality of the narrator. Thesis statement The war between Japan had severe effects on both America and Japan. Several families were relocated to internment camps where they faced harsh living conditions and inadequate resources as they were discriminated against and arrested. However, Japan suffered much of the consequences, which progressed for a long time, even after the war. One of them was the vital force of racism within America against the Japanese living in the USA in the mid-20s. Primary Sources Mori, Floyd. “Racism in World War II Brought Shame to the Japanese Americans.” Medium. The Collector, September 4, 2020. https://medium.com/the-collector/racism-in-worldwar-ii-brought-shame-to-the-japanese-americans-95694bbec69a. Magazine, Smithsonian. “The Injustice of Japanese-American Internment Camps Resonates Strongly to This Day.” Smithsonian.com. Smithsonian Institution, January 1, 2017. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/injustice-japanese-americans-internmentcamps-resonates-strongly-180961422/. 3 Cliffs Notes. Farewell to Manzanar: Cliffs Notes. New York: Hungry Minds, 2001. The United States. Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians. Personal Justice Denied: Report of the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians. Reprinted for the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. 102d Congress, 2d Session, Committee Print No. 6. Washington DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1992. P18. Available digitally at: https://www.archives.gov/research/japaneseamericans/justice-denied UShistory.org. “51e. Japanese-American Internment,” n.d http://www.ushistory.org/us/51e.asp. Annotated Bibliography . Mori, Floyd. “Racism in World War II Brought Shame to the Japanese Americans.” Medium. The Collector, September 4, 2020. https://medium.com/the-collector/racism-inworld-war-ii-brought-shame-to-the-japanese-americans-95694bbec69a. The source gives information about the shameful acts that befell the Japanese Americans within and after the war. They include arrests and racist activities against the Japanese Americans. Many of such families were taken into intermittent camps where life was not bearable for them and their families. From the article, one can find all the required information about the difficulties the imprisoned Japanese Americans face due to racial composition, among others. About 120,000 men, women, and children of Japanese ancestry were evicted from the West Coast of the United States and held in relocation camps across the country after President Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9102 of 1942. The article states that from 1942 to 1945, the U.S. Government forcibly removed over 46,000 Japanese and Japanese-Americans from their homes who arrived in Arizona to wait out the war in relocation camps located in Gila River and Poston. 4 Magazine, Smithsonian. “The Injustice of Japanese-American Internment Camps Resonates Strongly to This Day.” Smithsonian.com. Smithsonian Institution, January 1, 2017. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/injustice-japanese-americans-internmentcamps-resonates-strongly-180961422/. The magazine talks about the long-term effect of the injustice done to the Japanese Americans in the Internment camps. Through several survivors, the article gives a clear picture of the impact of the internment camps. People like Jane Yanagi Diamond, who at the time of the interview is 77, claim that he can talk about the history of the Internment camping. H exclaims that moving forward past the experience is the key to happiness rather than remaining in gloom and doom, making one feel sorry for themselves over time. Paul Kitagaki Jr., a photojournalist who is the son and grandson of internees, who is said to have been working reticence since 2005, can find over more than 900 pictures taken by War Relocation Authority photographers and others. The pictures include his father and family at a relocation center in Oakland, California, by one of his professional heroes, Dorothea Lange, among others. The United States. Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians. Personal Justice Denied: Report of the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians. Reprinted for the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. 102d Congress, 2d Session, Committee Print No. 6. Washington DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1992. P18. Available digitally at: https://www.archives.gov/research/japaneseamericans/justice-denied The source is very informative and expounds much about the work of the United States Wartime Commission on civilians with whom most of them were the Japanese and American Japanese. It is good to note that this article can effectively confirm the Story behind Jeanne 5 Wakatsuki writing about their experiences in the camps and during the transitioning time from centers to normal livelihood. It affirms her reasons why the father was arrested, leaving them with the mother at the base and only to come back a year later. It gives the

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