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Guided Practice Lab Report Before completing this guided practice report, you should have completed the associated procedure. Screenshots As you complete the procedure for the guided practice, add your screenshots below. Guided Practice Questions After you have completed the procedure for the guided practice, provide your answers to the guided practice questions here. 5/26/2021 2.6 Guided Practice: Handling Complex Deployments Start Assignment Due May 23 by 11:59pm Points 100 Submitting a file upload 2.6 Guided Practice Handling Complex Deployments Ansible’s strengths include the ability to facilitate the configuration of hundreds, or even thousands, of computers that include groups that may be dependent on other groups, which can involve the secure backing up of data as well as replication. Before you begin, please be sure you have completed the previous guided practices.  Instructions In this Guided Practice, you will edit the Ansible Inventory (hosts) file creating and using groups. You will then create and run Ansible playbooks that include conditional logic from your CentOS computer to monitor and configure the different operating systems on your network. Follow the instructions below to complete your assignment: 1. Download the Guided Practice_Handling Complex Deployments (https://ecpi.instructure.com/courses/82367/files/15943028/download?download_frd=1) . 2. Download the Guided Practice Lab Report Template (https://ecpi.instructure.com/courses/82367/files/15710943/download?download_frd=1) . NOTE: This is the only document you will submit. As you complete the procedure, use this template to document the required screenshots and answer the Guided Practice questions. 3. Save your file, and submit it using the instructions below.  Important: This Guided Practice should be performed in the VCASTLE Pod for Guided Practices. Watch this video (https://media.ecpi.net/media/Generic/VCastlePods.mp4) if you need a refresher on how to access the correct pod. https://ecpi.instructure.com/courses/82367/assignments/2408336?module_item_id=8530628 1/2 5/26/2021 2.6 Guided Practice: Handling Complex Deployments  Submission Desktop Mobile Select the Submit Assignment button to the right. Click Choose File, located in the File Upload box. Navigate to your file location. Once the file is located, select it, and then select the Open button. Click Submit Assignment to complete the upload process. Select the Submit Assignment button below. Click Files and navigate to your file location. Once the file is located, select it, and then click Submit in the top right-hand corner to complete the upload process. Guided Practice Rubric Criteria Student included all of the required screenshots. Student answered all guided practice questions thoroughly and accurately. Ratings 50 pts Full Marks 50 pts Full Marks Pts 0 pts Incorrect image or no submission 0 pts Incorrect or no response 50 pts 50 pts Total Points: 100 https://ecpi.instructure.com/courses/82367/assignments/2408336?module_item_id=8530628 2/2 Guided Practice: Handling Complex Deployments Introduction Ansible’s strengths include the ability to facilitate the configuration of hundreds, or even thousands, of computers that include groups that may be dependent on other groups, which can involve the secure backing up of data as well as replication. Outcome In this Guided Practice, you will edit the Ansible Inventory (hosts) file creating and using groups. You will then create and run Ansible playbooks that include conditional logic from your CentOS computer to monitor and configure the different operating systems on your network. Resources Needed • For this Guided Practice we will use CentOS 8, Windows 2019 server, and the Ubuntu 20.04 LTS machines in the VCastle pod configured for this class. Level of Difficulty Moderate to high Deliverables Deliverables are marked with a red border around the screenshot. Additionally, there are guided practice questions at the end which you must respond to. Your username or studentID should be visible in all screenshots that you submit. General Considerations You should be familiar with Linux networking. Secure Shell (ssh) should already be configured on your Ubuntu computer from a prior Guided Practice. Ansible should be installed and configured on your CentOS Computer from a prior Guided Practice. Optimizing your text editor for writing playbooks in YAML will simplify the creation and editing of playbooks. Edit the Ansible Inventory (host) File to Reflect Your Network Architecture 1. Edit the inventory (hosts) file. Please note that the IP addresses shown in the examples may not reflect your network configuration. The webserver and dbserver IP address for your network will most likely be 192.168.1.3, and the win machine 192.168.1.2. The multiple entries are intended to demonstrate more complex scenarios possible with Ansible. The [win:vars] section must be entered as shown. The examples have been developed using vim as an editor configured for YAML, as shown in a previous Guided Practice. Ensure your inventory file reflects the architecture of your network as shown below. 2. Modify the hosts file to add a complex1 group, which should point to your Ubuntu server. 3. Write a Playbook to count processes on the machine specified in the hosts file and on the Ansible server. 4. Open a shell, and type the following input remembering to replace “alex” with the correct user ID for your system (Note: The command is wc “dash lower-case L” and not a negative numerical 1): vim count_processes.yml i — hosts: complex1, localhost remote_user: alex tasks: – name: count processes running on the remote system shell: ps | wc -l register: remote_processes_number – name: Print remote running process debug: msg: ‘{{ remote_processes_number.stdout }}’ – name: Count processes running on the local system local_action: shell ps | wc -l register: local_processes_number – name: Print local running processes debug: msg: ‘{{ local_processes_number.stdout }}’ :wq Take a screenshot that resembles the one above, and paste it in your Lab Report. Check the Syntax, and Run the Playbook Note that the IP addresses in your output will reflect your network architecture and may differ from what is shown below. In a shell type the following: ansible-playbook count_processes.yml –syntax-check Press Enter. Then run: ansible-playbook count_processes.yml Take a screenshot that resembles the one above, and paste it in your Lab Report. Write a Playbook to Install or Update vim on the Linux Systems Write a Playbook to install or update vim on the Linux systems, and download Notepad++ to the Windows server using an operating system conditional clause. 1. Edit the hosts file to create a group called complex4 containing the Ubuntu and Windows systems. (NOTE: Your output may reflect a failure to install for the Red Hat family of systems.) 2. Create a playbook to install vim on the Debian and Red Hat-based systems and download the Notepad installer to the Windows server. You may have to edit the URL for the Notepad++ installer to reflect the most recent version. It also may be necessary to create the destination directory before running your playbook. Remember, it is advisable to perform a syntax check on your playbook before executing it. In a shell type: — hosts: complex4 remote_user: alex tasks: – name: Print the ansible_os_family value debug: msg: ‘{{ ansible_os_family }}’ – name: Ensure vim package is updated on RedHat servers yum: name: vim state: latest become: True when: ansible_os_family == ‘RedHat’ – name: Ensure the vim package is updated on Debian servers apt: name: vim state: latest become: True when: ansible_os_family == ‘Debian’ – name: Download Notepad++ win_get_url: url: https://github.com/notepad-plus-plus/notepad-plusplus/releases/download/v7.9.3/npp.7.9.3.Installer.exe dest: C:\ansible1 when: ansible_os_family == ‘Windows’ NOTE: Please remember that, depending upon your vim configuration, the spaces may show up as periods or as spaces. (Of course, the periods in the url always appear as periods.) Take a screenshot that resembles the one above, and paste it in your Lab Report. In a shell, type: ansible-playbook conditional_vim_w_win.yml –syntax-check ansible-playbook conditional_vim_w_win.yml –ask-become-pass Your results may vary based on what has already been installed, and you may disregard any deprecation warning, but there should not be any errors. Take a screenshot that resembles the one above, and paste it in your Lab Report. Write a Playbook to Install Apache on Windows NOTE: Make sure that your hosts file contains a [win] group that points to your Windows server. In a shell, type: vim install_apache_win.yml i — name: Install Apache hosts: win tasks: – name: Create Directory win_shell: mkdir c:\ansible_examples args: executable: cmd.exe – name: Download the Apache installer win_get_url: url: https://archive.apache.org/dist/httpd/binaries/win32/httpd2.2.25-win32-x86-no_ssl.msi dest: C:\ansible_examples\httpd-2.2.25-win32-x86-no_ssl.msi – name: Install MSI win_package: path: C:\ansible_examples\httpd-2.2.25-win32-x86-no_ssl.msi state: present :wq NOTE: Please remember that, depending upon your vim configuration, the spaces may show up as periods or as spaces. (Of course, the periods in the url always appear as periods.) In a shell, type the following. (NOTE: If you run this playbook twice, you may receive an error because the C:\ansible_examples directory would have been created already. If that is the case, simply delete the directory.) ansible-playbook install_apache_win.yml –syntax-check ansible-playbook install_apache_win.yml Take a screenshot that resembles the one above, and paste it in your Lab Report. Log in to the Windows machine, open a command prompt, navigate to the C:\Program Files (x86)\Apache Software Foundation\Apache2.2\bin directory, and type: httpd -v Take a screenshot that resembles the one above, and paste it in your Lab Report. Guided Practice Questions In your Guided Practice Lab Report, answer the following questions about this learning activity. Some may require research. 1. Break down and explain the output of the shell ps | wc -l command. 2. Does it make sense to create a separate group for the local_action exercise, or would it be easier to use the IP address? Discuss. 3. What does the command ‘{{ local_processes_number.stdout }}’ generate? 4. What procedures and or policies would you enact to manage your inventory file? References GeekFlare. (2020). 9 Ansible playbooks example for Windows administration. https://geekflare.com/ansible-playbook-windows-example/ Henderson, B. (2019). Connecting to a Windows host. https://www.ansible.com/blog/connecting-to-awindows-host McKay, D. (2019). How to use pipes on Linux. https://www.howtogeek.com/438882/how-to-use-pipeson-linux/ Hochstein, L. & Moser, R. (2017) Ansible: Up and running. [Kindle]. JavaTpoint. (2018). Ansible commands cheat sheets. https://www.javatpoint.com/ansible-commandscheat-sheets Kenlon, S. (2019). 10 YAML tips for people who hate YAML. https://www.redhat.com/sysadmin/yamltips LinuxBuz. (2020). Ansible apt module – tutorial and examples. https://linuxbuz.com/linuxhowto/ansibleapt-module NGEL. (2020). YAML Script: Second ansible playbook to get date and server uptime status. https://ngelinux.com/yaml-script-first-ansible-playbook-to-get-date-and-server-uptime-status/ OS Radar. (2020). How to enable SSH in Windows Server 2019. https://www.osradar.com/how-toenable-ssh-in-windows-server-2019/ RedHat. (2020c). Glossary. https://docs.ansible.com/ansible/latest/reference_appendices/glossary.html Kelom. (2020). Ansible – MYSQL installation. https://medium.com/@kelom.x/ansible-mysql-installation2513d0f70faf https://archive.apache.org/dist/httpd/binaries/win32/httpd-2.2.25-win32-x86-no_ssl.msi 5/26/2021 3.5 Performance Assessment: Adding Users and Resetting Passwords Using Custom Modules Start Assignment Due Sunday by 11:59pm Allowed Attempts 1 Points 100 Submitting a file upload Attempts 0 3.5 Performance Assessment Adding Users and Resetting Passwords Using Custom Modules Now that you have completed the guided practices for this week, you are ready to complete the Performance Assessment. Before you begin, be sure you have completed the following: All readings for this week All guided practices for this week  Instructions In this Performance Assessment, you perform the tasks you have been taught in the Guided Practices. You may use the book, and any notes you have, along with the Linux man pages. You may look at your prior output. You may not give or receive help from other students. You may ask your instructor for assistance, but it is likely to cost points. 1. Download the Performance Assessment_Adding Users and Resetting Passwords Using Custom Modules (https://ecpi.instructure.com/courses/82367/files/15710980/download? download_frd=1) . 2.  Open the Linux User Management Tip Sheet (https://ecpi.instructure.com/courses/82367/files/15710952/download?download_frd=1) . You should become familiar with this spreadsheet, as it will help you complete this performance assessment. 3. Follow the instructions for each item.

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