During World War II, Katharine Cook Briggs and her daughter Isabel Briggs Myers used Jung’s work to develop the now famous Myers-Briggs type indicator (MBTI). While the tool has been used in several applications, the goal was to serve as a way for individuals to identify their psychological type. In our textbook, the authors put together a brief summary to help identify each person’s unique personality and preferred behavior style. Take a moment and use the descriptions on page 63 to self-assess. In their 2008 book Strengths Based Leadership: Great Leaders, Teams, and Why People Follow, authors Tom Rath and Barry Conchie stressed the fact the most effective leaders: • spend a great deal of time and effort in cultivating the strengths of those already part of the organization, • build the strongest teams possible with the most talented people in the organization, and • have empathy for the members of the team and each person’s unique skills, talents, and needs (Rath & Conchie, 2008). The basic understanding of leadership and how to maximize your personal effectiveness is key to becoming the catalyst to help your organization move closer and closer to living out its mission. Gone are the days of the local healthcare facility and staff serving as independent contractors. We now know too much about best practices, and combined with the explosion of social technology, we are working with a much more informed general public (although sometimes misinformed as well). As we move forward, we need to make sure we are clear that “leadership” can be a verb. When discussing the act of leadership, we understand it is the actions taken, and when we refer to the organizational leadership, we may be referring to those in power and decision-making positions or perhaps an entire team. Simply put, leadership can be tied to power and the influence it has over others both inside and outside the organization (Weiss et al., 2018). The role of the healthcare manager is to help all the members of the organizational team to work as a unit, as a team, and work toward a common goal. This philosophical approach does not diminish the uniqueness of each member of the team or discredit the creative and proactive initiative of every employee. Rather, the healthcare manager is the key component to assisting all members of the team implement research-based initiatives smoothly and, as a result, gain maximum impact for every person served by our organization. For 27 years, Mr. David served as a driver education teacher in a rural school district. The vast majority of the students who came to Mr. David’s class grew up on a farm and already knew the basics of driving. Mr. David used his time in the classroom and behind the wheel to fine-tune the student’s skills as a driver. Parallel parking, three-point turns, multi-lane land changes, and passing on a two-lane highway were skills. Each student under Mr. David learned those skills. Some took longer than others—some even required additional practice to gain mastery, but over the 27 years, Mr. David prided himself in what his students had accomplished individually. A similar situation occurs with the healthcare manager. The coworkers in an organization are not machines, they are humans with a wide range of needs and abilities. The 21st century healthcare manager is there to coach, teach, mentor, console, and model. Dr. Richard L. Daft is a professor of management at Vanderbilt University. Daft’s view of leadership is linked to relationships between the proclaimed leader(s) and the followers. Daft does not see those positions as locking people into specific roles (Daft, 2011). On a healthy team, members change positions with different initiatives, yet always focus on the specific strengths (gifts) of any particular team member at any specific period of time. Teams with that conceptual viewpoint see all members as leaders. The key elements of leadership can be illustrated with the following diagram: 4 of 5 Purpose Evolution Change Leaders Coaching/ Mentoring Integrity/ Responsibility For our purposes, we will break down the illustration with the following simple definitions: . • The purpose is a joint venture between the leadership and the rest of those making up the team. This is a shared vision of the future. • The change element of this structure implies the reality that we live in a world of constant change. Our focus is to harness that power and help guide that change process. When the diagram uses the phrase “integrity/responsibility,” the intent is to seek something beyond our self and things that will bring personal gain, but rather to center on what is for the greater good of the group or organization. • The phrase coaching/mentoring makes the link between the leader(s) and the followers and how they work together. Leaders are challenged in helping team members grow in their skill sets and their philosophical understanding of the overall organization and team. Coaching is a commonly used phrase in 21st century organizational leadership. The emphasis is not on passive actions but is more action-oriented—this is done with the team not to the team. • Evolution scares some future leaders. We all like stability and to be able to see the finish line for any process or initiative. The reality is that as the changes take place, the leader and the team members themselves will change. Each member of the process will be changed by the experience. In this process, it becomes obvious the role of the healthcare manager is one of being a servant leader. Today’s most effective healthcare managers do not seek to be served by coworkers but rather to reach out to help others. It might be compared to a customer service approach. Servant leaders view everyone around them as their customer (e.g., patients, parents, administrators, support staff, colleagues, service providers). A servant leader attempts to meet every person where they are and help them reach a new level of understanding without specific reward or acknowledgement. That servant leader is not over anyone yet walks beside those he or she works with. They help everyone they work with grow personally and/or professionally and does so without intimidation. Who are some leaders from your past who have modeled servant leadership? What impact did they have on the people they worked with and the overall organization in which they worked? References Cahn, S. M. (1997). Classic and contemporary readings in the philosophy of education. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill. HCM 5100, Building Professional Teams 4 Daft, R. L. (2011). The leadership experience (6th ed.). Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning. Jackson, E. (December 14, 2011). Six things best-in-class companies do to grow leaders. Forbes: Investing. Retrieved from http://www.forbes.com/sites/ericjackson/2011/12/14/6-things-best-in-class-companies- do-to-grow-leaders/#424f5f5d6844 The Myers & Briggs Foundation. (n.d.). CG Jungs theory. Retrieved from http://www.myersbriggs.org/my- mbti-personality-type/mbti-basics/c-g-jungs-theory.htm Rath, T. & Conchie, B. (2008). Strengths based leadership: Great leaders, teams, and why people follow. New York, NY: Gallup Press. Weiss, D., Tilin, F., & Morgan, M. (2018). The interprofessional health care team: Leadership and development (2nd ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning. able to seize those opportunities, the impact you have on followers and the entire organization can live on through generations, and you will have altered the world around you (Rath & Conchie, 2008). This course is part of a building process, and you are building your leadership skills. We will spend the next few units focused on your personal leadership skills, and along with that, discuss the qualities that build teams. For many of us in the healthcare field, and we know the science and we know the research-based procedures and practices. Where, in our education, have we learned how to build teams to work toward a common goal and to deal with critical, and sometimes controversial, issues in a civil and proactive manner? Well, this course is a roadmap to help each of us grow in our leadership skill set. The fascination with leadership is somewhat a mystery. The authors, Weiss, Tilin, and Morgan, pose some challenging questions in the opening lines of Chapter 4: Perspectives on Leadership. Why do people choose to follow a particular leader? How do leaders become successful? Why do some leaders have such loyal supporters? What skills do each of us poses that contributes to leadership? How can we strengthen our own skill set to become better leaders? These are powerful questions, and each of them are valid questions. For each person to be successful in his or her chosen field of expertise, it is important to not only understand the science of leadership but also the art of leadership. How does one begin to discuss leadership without going all the way back to Plato and Socrates? In his work The Republic, Plato provided us with a simple formula. His simple explanation called upon leaders to adhere to well-grounded ethical standards and to educate future leaders to hold fast to those principles and values above all the forces which may challenge the organization and the leadership (Cahn, 1997). It is a huge challenge, yet, it can still be applied to our 21st-century world. Leaders grow leaders. In his 2011 essay 6 Things Best-In-Class Companies Do To Grow Leaders, Eric Jackson (2011) used an interesting analogy when looking at the vacuum in leadership in some organizations. Jackson realized some of the best organizations do not rely on outside recruiters or “head hunters” to fill the leadership void but rather look inwardly and put programs in place to grow leaders from within. He did not want to imply this was a narrowing of the path to leadership but rather an ongoing process. Therefore, we constantly are helping raise up future leaders who understand what the organization stands for because they have grown up as leaders within that structure. So how do we select our leaders? Dr. Bill George is a professor at Harvard Business School. Prior to joining the ranks of the academic world, George was the chairperson and chief executive officer of Medtronics. Dr. George made a general statement when he said people too often get wrapped up in the glitter and showmanship and look up to leaders for their style and showmanship rather than the substance of what they stand for. Is it the hyped or the boring (yet meaningful) past performance that tells more about a person’s integrity? (Daft, 2011). Combine that thought with Jackson’s ideas about growing our own, and we begin to see the positive impact systemic leadership and team building can have on any organization, especially in the healthcare field. As we go back to Plato, his words emphasized that same theme-leadership is anchored in more than the outward appearance or show, it is rooted in the inner self (Cahn, 1997). In other words, everyone called to be a leader in the healthcare arena is already overwhelmed with the tasks before them every day. The demands are high, and the expectation for perfection is the standard. Despite all of that, you are here, working on a degree to improve the healthcare world around you. So, here we are discussing building tomorrow’s leaders. Weiss et al. (2018) spend a great deal of time in their book, The Interprofessional Health Care Team: Leadership and Development discussing personality and traits of leaders. They place a great deal of emphasis on the idea that leadership can be described as an amazing celestial grouping of leadership traits similar to a constellation (Weiss et al., 2018). Carl G. Jung, the Swiss-born psychiatrist, once captured that thought when he pointed out that on the surface, there may appear to be random actions that are really the differences in how individuals have chosen to use their gifts and talents (The Myers & Briggs Foundation, n.d.). Jung generalized that people engage in one of two mental functions: taking in information which he referred to as “perceiving,” or organizing information in such a way as to come to conclusions, which he referred to as “judging” (The Myers & Briggs Foundation, n.d.). Earlier in this century, leadership consultants Tom Rath and Barry Conchie combined to author a book entitled Strengths Based Leadership: Great Leaders, Teams, and Why People Follow. As part of the introduction to the book, the authors simply explain that only the best leaders will have success (Rath & Conchie, 2008). The authors go on to ask the readers to step back and reflect for a moment on leaders whom the individual reader respects. It made no difference to the authors if the reader was thinking in a context of a leader internationally, nationally, at a corporate level, locally, or even in a family. The only criteria were the fact the chosen leader continues to exist because he or she impacted the reader’s life, and that experience has altered our thoughts and ideas (Rath & Conchie, 2008). The point Rath and Conchie made is the fact that the specific leader has impacted the course of the reader’s life forever. So why did Rath and Conchie find it necessary to open their book with such an all-encompassing set of statements? Their point was simple: Those impactful leaders may not realize the impact they had on your life, yet the lessons learned live on in your existence and your leadership style. As leaders, each of you will have a chance multiple times throughout your professional and personal life to impact the life of followers. If you are During World War II, Katharine Cook Briggs and her daughter Isabel Briggs Myers used Jung’s work to develop the now famous Myers-Briggs type indicator (MBTI). While the tool has been used in several applications, the goal was to serve as a way for individuals to identify their psychological type. In our textbook, the authors put together a brief summary to help identify each person’s unique personality and preferred behavior style. Take a moment and use the descriptions on page 63 to self-assess. In their 2008 book Strengths Based Leadership: Great Leaders, Teams, and Why People Follow, authors Tom Rath and Barry Conchie stressed the fact the most effective leaders: • spend a great deal of time and effort in cultivating the strengths of those already part of the organization, • build the strongest teams possible with the most talented people in the organization, and • have empathy for the members of the team and each person’s unique skills, talents, and needs (Rath & Conchie, 2008). The basic understanding of leadership and how to maximize your personal effectiveness is key to becoming the catalyst to help your organization move closer and closer to living out its mission. Gone are the days of the local healthcare facility and staff serving as independent contractors. We now know too much about best practices, and combined with the explosion of social technology, we are working with a much more informed general public (although sometimes misinformed as well). As we move forward, we need to make sure we are clear that “leadership” can be a verb. When discussing the act of leadership, we understand it is the actions taken, and when we refer to the organizational leadership, we may be referring to those in power and decision-making positions or perhaps an entire team. Simply put, leadership can be tied to power and the influence it has over others both inside and outside the organization (Weiss et al., 2018). The role of the healthcare manager is to help all the members of the organizational team to work as a unit, as a team, and work toward a common goal. This philosophical approach does not diminish the uniqueness of each member of the team or discredit the creative and proactive initiative of every employee. Rather, the healthcare manager is the key component to assisting all members of the team implement research-based initiatives smoothly and, as a result, gain maximum impact for every person served by our organization. For 27 years, Mr. David served as a driver education teacher in a rural school district. The vast majority of the students who came to Mr. David’s class grew up on a farm and already knew the basics of driving. Mr. David used his time in the classroom and behind the wheel to fine-tune the student’s skills as a driver. Parallel parking, three-point turns, multi-lane land changes, and passing on a two-lane highway were skills. Each student under Mr. David learned those skills. Some took longer than others—some even required additional practice to gain mastery, but over the 27 years, Mr. David prided himself in what his students had accomplished individually. A similar situation occurs with the healthcare manager. The coworkers in an organization are not machines, they are humans with a wide range of needs and abilities. The 21st century healthcare manager is there to coach, teach, mentor, console, and model. Dr. Richard L. Daft is a professor of management at Vanderbilt University. Daft’s view of leadership is linked to relationships between the proclaimed leader(s) and the followers. Daft does not see those positions as locking people into specific roles (Daft, 2011). On a healthy team, members change positions with different initiatives, yet always focus on the specific strengths (gifts) of any particular team member at any specific period of time. Teams with that conceptual viewpoint see all members as leaders. The key elements of leadership can be illustrated with the following diagram: able to seize those opportunities, the impact you have on followers and the entire organization can live on through generations, and you will have altered the world around you (Rath & Conchie, 2008). This course is part of a building process, and you are building your leadership skills. We will spend the next few units focused on your personal leadership skills, and along with that, discuss the qualities that build teams. For many of us in the healthcare field, and we know the science and we know the research-based procedures and practices. Where, in our education, have we learned how to build teams to work toward a common goal and to deal with critical, and sometimes controversial, issues in a civil and proactive manner? Well, this course is a roadmap to help each of us grow in our leadership skill set. The fascination with leadership is somewhat a mystery. The authors, Weiss, Tilin, and Morgan, pose some challenging questions in the opening lines of Chapter 4: Perspectives on Leadership. Why do people choose to follow a particular leader? How do leaders become successful? Why do some leaders have such loyal supporters? What skills do each of us poses that contributes to leadership? How can we strengthen our own skill set to become better leaders? These are powerful questions, and each of them are valid questions. For each person to be successful in his or her chosen field of expertise, it is important to not only understand the science of leadership but also the art of leadership. How does one begin to discuss leadership without going all the way back to Plato and Socrates? In his work The Republic, Plato provided us with a simple formula. His simple explanation called upon leaders to adhere to well-grounded ethical standards and to educate future leaders to hold fast to those principles and values above all the forces which may challenge the organization and the leadership (Cahn, 1997). It is a huge challenge, yet, it can still be applied to our 21st-century world. Leaders grow leaders. In his 2011 essay 6 Things Best-In-Class Companies Do To Grow Leaders, Eric Jackson (2011) used an interesting analogy when looking at the vacuum in leadership in some organizations. Jackson realized some of the best organizations do not rely on outside recruiters or “head hunters” to fill the leadership void but rather look inwardly and put programs in place to grow leaders from within. He did not want to imply this was a narrowing of the path to leadership but rather an ongoing process. Therefore, we constantly are helping raise up future leaders who understand what the organization stands for because they have grown up as leaders within that structure. So how do we select our leaders? Dr. Bill George is a professor at Harvard Business School. Prior to joining the ranks of the academic world, George was the chairperson and chief executive officer of Medtronics. Dr. George made a general statement when he said people too often get wrapped up in the glitter and showmanship and look up to leaders for their style and showmanship rather than the substance of what they stand for. Is it the hyped or the boring (yet meaningful) past performance that tells more about a person’s integrity? (Daft, 2011). Combine that thought with Jackson’s ideas about growing our own, and we begin to see the positive impact systemic leadership and team building can have on any organization, especially in the healthcare field. As we go back to Plato, his words emphasized that same theme-leadership is anchored in more than the outward appearance or show, it is rooted in the inner self (Cahn, 1997). In other words, everyone called to be a leader in the healthcare arena is already overwhelmed with the tasks before them every day. The demands are high, and the expectation for perfection is the standard. Despite all of that, you are here, working on a degree to improve the healthcare world around you. So, here we are discussing building tomorrow’s leaders. Weiss et al. (2018) spend a great deal of time in their book, The Interprofessional Health Care Team: Leadership and Development discussing personality and traits of leaders. They place a great deal of emphasis on the idea that leadership can be described as an amazing celestial grouping of leadership traits similar to a constellation (Weiss et al., 2018). Carl G. Jung, the Swiss-born psychiatrist, once captured that thought when he pointed out that on the surface, there may appear to be random actions that are really the differences in how individuals have chosen to use their gifts and talents (The Myers & Briggs Foundation, n.d.). Jung generalized that people engage in one of two mental functions: taking in information which he referred to as “perceiving,” or organizing information in such a way as to come to conclusions, which he referred to as “judging” (The Myers & Briggs Foundation, n.d.). 4 of 5 Purpose Evolution Change Leaders Coaching/ Mentoring Integrity/ Responsibility For our purposes, we will break down the illustration with the following simple definitions: . • The purpose is a joint venture between the leadership and the rest of those making up the team. This is a shared vision of the future. • The change element of this structure implies the reality that we live in a world of constant change. Our focus is to harness that power and help guide that change process. When the diagram uses the phrase “integrity/responsibility,” the intent is to seek something beyond our self and things that will bring personal gain, but rather to center on what is for the greater good of the group or organization. • The phrase coaching/mentoring makes the link between the leader(s) and the followers and how they work together. Leaders are challenged in helping team members grow in their skill sets and their philosophical understanding of the overall organization and team. Coaching is a commonly used phrase in 21st century organizational leadership. The emphasis is not on passive actions but is more action-oriented—this is done with the team not to the team. • Evolution scares some future leaders. We all like stability and to be able to see the finish line for any process or initiative. The reality is that as the changes take place, the leader and the team members themselves will change. Each member of the process will be changed by the experience. In this process, it becomes obvious the role of the healthcare manager is one of being a servant leader. Today’s most effective healthcare managers do not seek to be served by coworkers but rather to reach out to help others. It might be compared to a customer service approach. Servant leaders view everyone around them as their customer (e.g., patients, parents, administrators, support staff, colleagues, service providers). A servant leader attempts to meet every person where they are and help them reach a new level of understanding without specific reward or acknowledgement. That servant leader is not over anyone yet walks beside those he or she works with. They help everyone they work with grow personally and/or professionally and does so without intimidation. Who are some leaders from your past who have modeled servant leadership? What impact did they have on the people they worked with and the overall organization in which they worked? References Cahn, S. M. (1997). Classic and contemporary readings in the philosophy of education. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill. HCM 5100, Building Professional Teams 4 Daft, R. L. (2011). The leadership experience (6th ed.). Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning. Jackson, E. (December 14, 2011). Six things best-in-class companies do to grow leaders. Forbes: Investing. Retrieved from http://www.forbes.com/sites/ericjackson/2011/12/14/6-things-best-in-class-companies- do-to-grow-leaders/#424f5f5d6844 The Myers & Briggs Foundation. (n.d.). CG Jungs theory. Retrieved from http://www.myersbriggs.org/my- mbti-personality-type/mbti-basics/c-g-jungs-theory.htm Rath, T. & Conchie, B. (2008). Strengths based leadership: Great leaders, teams, and why people follow. New York, NY: Gallup Press. Weiss, D., Tilin, F., & Morgan, M. (2018). The interprofessional health care team: Leadership and development (2nd ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Do you have a similar assignment and would want someone to complete it for you? Click on the ORDER NOW option to get instant services at essayloop.com. We assure you of a well written and plagiarism free papers delivered within your specified deadline.